Friday, June 17, 2011

Reading

Let not thy left hand know what thy right hand doeth. Matt. 6:3


My 12-year-old son just finished his first adult novel based on the passage above: Magnificent Obsession by Lloyd C. Douglas. It was the first adult book that I read as well, at age 12, so we had a great long talk about it and I told him he is free to read any of Douglas' books. I have most of them -- some are actually my mother's old and tattered copies. Just fingering them, and seeing how she underlined some of the text brought tears to my eyes.


I wanted to share Adventures in Two Worlds by A. J. Cronin next, since he is another one of my heros. Actually he planted the seed to become a writer since he was a physician-turned-writer. I thought I'd be a grandmother before I'd pen any books, but I'm delighted I didn't wait. But my copy is missing. I don't remember whether someone borrowed it or if it's just misplaced it, even though I have all my fiction in alphabetical order by author.


I thought this book was out of print, but I see that it's been reprinted. I no longer have to fret over my missing copy. Hooray!


I love passing on my mother's legacy. These books changed my life and for the better. Even though I have shared many books from my childhood with my children, I don't know why MO makes me feel like we've reached a milestone. There is no celebration per se, but my heart is full.

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3 comments:

Angelina C. Hansen said...

What a beautiful legacy you give to your child, Vijaya.

Marcia said...

It's just really special that the first adult book you BOTH read was the same one, and such a wonderful one.

I'm wracking my brain, and cannot remember for sure what my first adult novel was. My dad had a huge collection, though.

Vijaya said...

Thanks, Angelina. We love to talk books.

Marcia, it's really that it's the first adult novel at the same age.

I should've made clear that this isn't my son's first adult book. I allow him to read all kinds of adult nonfiction (about cars and airplanes and some biographies).

Fiction can tell a deeper truth, sometimes, and it's so wonderful to share this.